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Shady Areas

Shady Areas

Planting roses in shady positions is a great way of bringing colour and interest to forgotten areas of the garden. Although, in general, roses will not thrive in a position where there is too much shade, the varieties listed below will do surprisingly well with only four or five hours of good sun each day. The main consideration when planting roses in shady positions is to avoid areas where there are overhanging branches and dry places where there would be too much competition from the roots of trees and other shrubs. Most of David Austin’s repeat-flowering English Roses perform well in partial shade, as well as other repeat-flowering shrub roses, such as the Hybrid Musks, Rugosas and Ground Covers. Many once flowering varieties are suitable for growing in partial shade, particularly the Gallicas, Damasks and Albas. The climbing and rambling roses listed below are all suitable for an open, north facing wall or other shady position. Again, they only require four or five hours of good sun each day.

   

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  1. Princess Anne

    Princess Anne

    English Shrub Rose
    The young flowers are deep pink, almost red, fading to pure rich pink. The rather narrow petals are unusually substantial, with a hint of yellow on their undersides. Held in large, fragrant clusters, they are produced with remarkable freedom. A particularly healthy variety; it forms a bushy, upright shrub with thick, succulent, highly polished foliage. Named for Her Royal Highness, the Princess Royal.. David Austin, 2010.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  2. England's Rose

    England's Rose

    English Shrub Rose
    Bears large clusters of rich glowing pink flowers, the outer petals eventually reflexing back to reveal an attractive button eye. The blooms are produced almost continuously from June right through to the first frosts and do not ball in the rain. They have a warm, spicy Old Rose fragrance. It forms an attractive, bushy shrub. David Austin, 2010.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  1. Hansa

    Hansa

    Rugosa Rose
    At first sight, this is a very similar rose to ‘Roseraie de l’Hay’, but the flowers are fully double and bright silky magenta in colour. They have a lovely Old Rose fragrance. It produces a good crop of hips in the autumn, extending the season of colour in the garden. Schaumᅠ&ᅠVanᅠTol, 1865.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  2. Veilchenblau

    Veilchenblau

    Rambling Rose
    Produces large, closely packed clusters of small, cupped flowers. They open purple-magenta with a white centre, occasionally streaked white too, each with an attractive boss of bright yellow stamens. As the blooms age, they fade to lilac-grey – appearing almost blue on occasions. There is a fresh, fruity scent with rich orange notes. The growth is rather stiff and almost thornless. Schmidt, 1869.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  1. Tuscany Superb

    Tuscany Superb

    Old Rose
    A very similar rose to 'Tuscany' but with larger flowers and taller growth. The magenta-red semi-double, many petalled flowers are fragrant with golden stamens. It forms a sturdy shrub with spreading, upright growth and plentiful foliage. ThomasᅠRiversᅠ&ᅠSonsᅠLtd., 1837.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  2. Tam o’Shanter

    Tam o’Shanter

    English Shrub Rose
    Deep pink, loosely formed rosettes held on long, beautifully arching branches, the flowers opening all along their length as we might find on a Species Rose. Its graceful, shrubby growth is most attractive. Named to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robbie Burns. Tam o' Shanter is the hero of one of his best known poems. David Austin, 2009.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  1. Morning Mist

    Morning Mist

    English Shrub Rose
    A striking variety with large, truly single flowers, which are a strong shade of coral-pink. They each have a large boss of yellow stamens with red anthers. It is one of the largest English Roses, forming a big, bushy shrub. Although repeat flowering, it also bears a superb crop of large orange hips through the winter. David Austin, 1996.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  2. Rosa Mundi

    Rosa Mundi

    Old Rose
    A sport of R. gallica 'Officinalis', sharing all of its characteristics except the fuchsia flowers are striped with white. Although only once flowering, it is a very showy plant, producing a mass of fragrant blooms. It forms a bushy, compact shrub. Priorᅠtoᅠ1600.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  1. Rose de Rêscht

    Rose de Rêscht

    Old Rose
    A very fragrant variety, bearing small, neat, very double, bright magenta flowers packed full with petals. It forms a compact shrub with shapely, bushy growth. The flowers are held well above the dense, rough textured, deep green foliage. 1840.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  2. Charles de Mills

    Charles de Mills

    Old Rose
    Particularly large, opulent flowers with many closely packed petals giving the impression of very flat, 'sliced-off' blooms. They are rich magentared and have a medium-strong fragrance. An attractive shrub; the growth is upright and arching. Unknown, c.1790.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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  1. R. gallica ‘Officinalis’

    R. gallica ‘Officinalis’

    Old Rose
    Large, semi-double, fuchsia flowers and a pure Old Rose scent. Very free-flowering, creating a mass of colour. Hips in autumn. A low branching shrub with ample foliage. Priorᅠtoᅠ1400.
    £18.50 - £25.50
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